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Spread joy with bubbles (*´ ˘ `*).。oO

There’s an elderly man who comes to the park
occasionally after school.
He wears a white hat and next to him is a bag of
two bubble swords and a big bottle of bubble soap.
The kids from the school opposite the park love him.
Let’s call him, Mr Bubbles.
Mr Bubbles would wave the sword in the air
like a wand to create big bubbles for the kids.
Big bubbles, big pretty bubbles in the air
There’s something so inherently innocent
about blowing bubbles.
Well, in this case, it’s waving bubbles.
A beautiful reminder that childhood lasts all through life.
It’s  fun just watching the bubbles float in the air and
see the kids jumping with joy and the smiles on their faces.
What an awesome way to spread some joy, Mr Bubbles.

mr bubbles-1

mr bubbles-2

mr bubbles-3

 

 

 

 

 

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7

STOveLEN moments

traditional stove
A couple of months ago, I saw this traditional Chinese charcoal stove by the roadside near my house.  Without hesitation, I took it home as it reminds me of my grandma’s stove and it brought back warm childhood memories. 
I grew up watching my grandma cook with this stove.  When my brother and I were older she taught us how to light the charcoal stove.   Back then, we would pour a bit of kerosene on the charcoal before using a matchstick to light it.  Then we use a handheld fan made from palm leaves to fan the flames.  And I remember my brother and I would get up early on a Saturday morning to light the charcoal stove to boil a big pot of soup for lunch. 
I kept this complimentary charcoal stove in the yard together with the rest of the empty flower pot.  Recently, Sydelle asked me to cook something using this stove.  Both my daughters think that this little stove is pretty fascinating.
Last Friday, I bought a bag of charcoal. On Saturday morning,  my hubby helped to light the charcoal stove.  He’s an excellent helper when it comes to stuff like this.  It takes about 15 – 20 minutes for the stove to heat up.  Then I put in a big pot of chicken soup to boil.

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After one and a half hours, the chicken soup is ready and it smells amazing.

soup is ready

Next, I cooked some tomato rice.  This is something quick and easy and it goes really well with the soup.
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Pour some olive oil. Saute onion, garlic and bacon

add canned tomato

Add a can of tomatoes

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Stir and add some black pepper and salt

add rice

Pour in the rice[pre-cooked]

stir-the-rice.jpg

Give it a good mix.  Remove pot from stove and cover it for about 10 minutes.

lunch is served

Lunch is served!

6

Hometown friends

84070-life-is-nothing-without-friends

CNY2018 with friends

[Back: Khim, M.Yook, O.Ngoh; Front: Me, Y.Kit, C.Huay, Ching, Hoon & Ping]

My hometown friends…
Some of us met in kindergarten
others in Primary or
Secondary school
Keep in touch” was penned in my
autograph book by most friends.
Many years have come and gone
Staying in touch has proved to be
much harder than we thought.
But yesterday,  I was thankful 
we made an effort to
come together for a simple
Chinese New Year lunch.
Though we missed those schoolmates
who were unable to join us.
It was fun to talk and laugh
about the good old days
the memories of our childhood
and school days that
have stayed with us and
kept us young at heart.
Some of us never did grow up,
grateful to those who accept
and tolerated our quirkiness.
We know each others’
strengths and weaknesses
yet we do not judge.
We accept each other
as individuals
with different views and
perspective about things.
After all, we are on this
journey called life with
the same hopes and dreams,
To be happy and healthy
To love and to feel loved
Peace of mind and a good night’s rest
To be accepted and knowing that
we have walked this journey
the best we know and could have.
hometown friends

[Ping, Hoon, Mary, O.Ngoh, Ching, Me & C.Huay]

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Quote of the day – Jaime Cohen

life

“We are in such a hurry to grow up, and then we long for our lost childhood. We make ourselves ill earning money, and then spend all our money on getting well again. We think so much about the future that we neglect the present, and thus experience neither the present nor the future. We live as if we were never going to die, and die as if we had never lived.” – Jaime Cohen

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5 Best Toys Ever

index

Wired magazine ran an article on the five best toys ever. Wired is one of the most innovative, bleeding-edge publications you’ll read about all things technological. Which is why at first the list surprised me, but then I realized their angle and couldn’t help but appreciate their wisdom.

5 Best Toys Ever – Dr James Emery White

Here’s the list:

1. Stick

2. Box

3. String

4. Cardboard Tube

5. Dirt

Anybody want to argue with them? I doubt it.

It’s an important reminder that the best things in life – and often in ministry, leadership, business and family – are the simple things.

The dilemma is how our culture seems to refuse to give simplicity a place.

But think about when it insists on intruding and the wake it leaves behind.

For example, a snowstorm brings your town to a standstill. You went out and stocked up on bread and milk and a few other things you didn’t really need, and settled in. The power goes out, so you light the candles and gather by the fireplace for warmth. Board games that had been gathering dust for years are pulled out. You play them and have more fun than you can remember. You then go outside and actually play, throw a snowball, make a snow-angel, build a snowman.

It’s golden.

You talk, years later, about that magic night. You’d give almost anything to go back and relive it, and wish there was a way to recreate it in the here and now.

In a complex, “always on” world, perhaps what we need to remember is that we need to intentionally unplug every now and then.

Even if just to remember that the best toys in the world – like the best times – are the most simple.

And in truth, the most available.

That is my holiday wish for you. May you enjoy the simplicity and holiness that resides in the stillness between Christmas and the new year.

And maybe some fun with a leftover box or two.

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